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How To Turn Flat Knitting Patterns Into Circular

 
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twobrownears
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 8:48 am    Post subject: How To Turn Flat Knitting Patterns Into Circular Reply with quote

Is there any simple formula for turning flat pattern stiches into the round?

I have been experiminting for a while and just can't seem to get the decreases or increses correct. There are some wonderful lace and cable patterns that I think would make beautiful socks, but they are all flat kntting. How do you turn them into patterns for a circle?

Barb R.
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yarnblossom
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have been doing this for a while now and find that some patterns work well and others make your brain hurt trying to do it. The ones I have done, usually require omiting stitches on one end or the other so that the pattern repeat doesn't have those extra end stitches. ie: if the pattern stitch starts with purl 2 and ends with purl 2, I leave off the first 2 purl stitches and then it works.

Sheila
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Pogo
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Recent patterns that expect pieces to be seamed should have one extra stitch at each side that will be included in a seam. Older ones didn't usually bother, as seaming then was edge-to-edge (flimsy!) instead of today's mattress stitch.

Pogo
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otherwiseka
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Barb,
I enjoy your informative exhanges in this forum.

Two keys to using lace flat patterns in the round:

1) patterns that have a plain purl or knit row following a lace pattern row are most easily translated to the round.

2) chart the design out. It makes it much easier to keep track of. Once you are quite used to following a chart for flat and in the round you can then work very intricate lace in the round from patterns written for flat knitting.
-db
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twobrownears
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 12:59 pm    Post subject: Question Reply with quote

I am not in to having my brain hurt any more than it already does! Which stitch patterns lend themselves best to being converted from flat to circular?

Thank you for all the help. Keep it coming! I am about to try to design my own socks Shocked Shocked

Barb R.
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yarnblossom
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DB Has it right, patterns with a plain knit or purl row after each pattern row work. The others are the ones that make my brain hurt and I give up on them and look for something else. I have two books with nothing but pattern stitches and one craft book that has some pages of pattern stitches and I spend a lot of time looking through them for patterns to try. I got one of them at a thrift store.

Sheila
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twobrownears
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 5:08 am    Post subject: Thanks Reply with quote

I got up this morning and poured my coffee, kissed hubby goodby and dove into my stitch pattern books. I will begin to experiment after I take some Aleve.

I am also playing around with with mixing crochet and knitting to make socks. I crocheted for almost 18 years running - from baby clothes to toys to blankets, fine lace for priestly vestments and trims for linen hankies.

I will get out the hooks and yarn and play the rest of the day. Thank you all for your advice. As I told Dlovesocks I know nothing. Were it not for this site and your undying patience with a lonely, soon to be empty nester, I would have dug a hole and jumped in long ago.

I wish I had Reaven's moms and moos to keep me busy. If I am on the site too much just throw me off or tell me to shut up. I won't take it personally.

Barb R.

Barb R.
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Pogo
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I hadn't even thought about "all even rows, purl across" patterns -- most patterns are that way. Those that aren't are real fun to convert to in the round, unless they're very simple -- stockinette (knit all rounds), garter (knit a round, purl a round), seed, that sort. Anyway, when it says to purl a row, knit a round.

Many lacy patterns have pattern stitch every other row. Some have pattern every row. One way is (officially) "knitting lace" and the other is "lace knitting." I forget which is which.

Pogo
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twobrownears
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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2006 5:03 am    Post subject: After A Bit.... Reply with quote

Wilth Yorkshire's question and the prior information that I had gotten earler, I know know exactly which patterns to convert.

I will try them out on the mini sock pattern I am writing and see how they come out.

Barb R.
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twobrownears
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 9:59 am    Post subject: Adapting Patterns for Circular Knitting Reply with quote

Taken verbatum from the Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns by Barbara Walker:

Directions for pattern stitches almost always are given in terms of straight knitting - that is, for working back and fourth on single-pointed needles. But if you want to use any particular pattern stitch for an article knitted in rounds-such as a sock, a skirt, a seamless sweater or a tubular dress-it is an easy matter to convert the pattern rows into rounds. There are only two major stpet to this process.

The first step is to omit the edge stitches. Most patterns have extra stitches at the beginning and end of each row, for finishing off the sides of a straight-knit piece. These are the "plus" stitches in "Multiple of___plus____". In circular knitting, you do not want to interrupt the continuious spiral of rounds with extra stitches that contribute nothing to the development of the pattern. So the number of stitches in a round should be mutiple required for the pattern only-plus none. For example, if a pattern takes a multiple of 10 stitches plus 3, you cast on a multiple of 10 stitches and forget the extra 3. Pattern rounds are worked from the directions given after the asterisk, ignoring what comes before it. Likewise, the ending material, if any, that follows "rep from * " is ignored. This is a simple matter when the pattern has the same number of edge stitches on every row.

But what if the edge stitches vary in number? Perhaps you want to use a pattern in which you see "k2" before the asterisk in one right-side row, and "k7" before the asterisk in the next right-side row. Clearly, it will throw your pattern out of kilter if you omit the 5 extra stitches and begin your next "right-side" round at the asterisk. So you must subract the same "k2" as before, and begin your round with "k5" --ie., the stitches left over after the same 2 edge stitches are removed. If you are in doubt about where the actual pattern starts and finishes, you can chart one or two repeats of the pattern on graph paper, including both edges, then draw a verticle line down each side of the actual pattern repeat to slice off stitches that are not needed. In this way it is easy to see just where to begin and end each round. Of course if you are working on a series of panels, this problem will not exist because there are no edge stitches to worry about.

PART 1


Last edited by twobrownears on Thu Jun 29, 2006 12:25 pm; edited 2 times in total
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twobrownears
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 10:32 am    Post subject: Adapting Patterns for Circular Knitting - PART 2 Reply with quote

The second step is to convert wrong-side rows into right-side rows. You are always on the right side of the fabric in circular knitting, so the wrong-side rows must be worked inside-out. There are different ways of doing this, depending on the type of pattern you are using.

In the first place, all wrong-side knit stitches must be worked as purl stitches, and vice versa. Since a purl stitch is only a backward knit stitch, it follows that the purl side of a stitch must be on the outside of the fabric if the wrong side is knit. Conversely, the knit side of the stitch must show if the wrong side is purled.

When using slip-stitch patterns, the wrong-side "with yarn in front" and "with yarn in back" must be reversed. If a wrong-side row calls for a stitch to be slipped with yarn in front, then that strand of yarn is to cross the stitch on the wrong side, where it will not show. Obviously this means slipping the same stitch with yarn in back when you are working in rounds. If a wrong-side stitch should be slipped with yarn in back in flat knitting, then in circular knitting it must be slipped with yarn in front.

The easiest patten to convert is a bisymmetrical one; that is, a pattern in which the right hand edge of the row is the same as the left hand edge, but in reverse. When rows become rounds, they all go from right to left, with none returning from left to right. So in a bisymmetrical pattern, you can read the wrong side rows just as they are given, from the beginning to the end, reversing knits and purls and other pattern operations as required. But if the pattern is not bisymmetrical, instead, going off center in some way, then all wrong-side rows must be read backward, from the end to the beginning. Remember that a wrong-side row in flat knitting works from left to right (looking at it from the right side of the fabric), wereas your "wrong-side" round progresses from right to left. Unless you are very experienced, or the pattern is very simple, it is not advisable to try reading these rows straight off from the end of the row to the beginning. It is too easy to miss things when you are reading this way. A better method it to re-write the pattern for yourself on a seperate piece of paper, turning the wrong-side rows around as you write them. Then you can work from these revised set of directions with much less likelihood of mistakes.

Taken verbatum from A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns by Barbara G. Walker


Last edited by twobrownears on Thu Jun 29, 2006 12:25 pm; edited 1 time in total
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goody2socks
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 11:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

twobrownears:
Just so you know - you are NOT contributing too often! I look forward to each of your submissions1 You are always informative and knowledgable, with just the right amount of humar and common sense. I am toying with the lace thing as well- but I will wait until you have it figured out. Smile
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twobrownears
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 6:25 pm    Post subject: Please DON'T wait for me.....!! Reply with quote

The two posts that I submitted today are for anyone wanting to know how to convert flat patterns to circular.

I posted the instructions from Barbara Walker's book because they are detailed and give you all the information needed to convert flat patterns. Follow her instructions and you shoud be fine.

That is what I intend to do......

I will submit more of her instructions later. I want to do some for myself first.

bjr
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twobrownears
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 1:06 pm    Post subject: Adapting Patterns for Circular Knitting PART 3 Reply with quote

Taken verbatum from A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns by Barbara G. Walker

Most patterns are very easily converted to circular knitting. A cable pattern in which the wrong-side rows call for "knit all knit sts and purl all purl sts" is very simple; you still do exactly that on every alternate round. A lace pattern in which all wrong-side rows are purled is very easy, too; you just knit (instead of purl) the alternate rounds. Those laces that have yarn-overs and decreases on both sides of the fabric are even easier; most of them were intended for circular knitting in the first place. "P2 tog", being a right-slanting decrease on the right side, is the same thing as "k2tog", and is so worked. "P2 tog-b" similarily converts to "ssk"--a left-slanting decrease. In conformity with the rule of reading wrong-side rows backward, the yarn-over-decrease unit that reads "yo, p2 tog" on the wrong side is worked in a round as "k2tog, yo". In the same way "p2 tog-b, yo" becomes "yo, ssk".

In circular knitting you will have some kind of marker on the needle to tell you where to finish one round and begin the next one. This can be a commercial ring marker, a safety pin, or a little hoop of sewing thread. It is carried right along with the knittng, being slipped from the left needle point to the right needle point each time you come around to it again and begin the next round. Sometimes the novice knitter will be using a pattern that travels diagonally, and will be working cheerfully along until she comes to the point where the diagonal pattern line crosses the marker; then she will panic. Here are two stitches that must be knitted togeather, and the marker is squarely in between them! What to do? And to which round does the decrease belong--the round just finished or the round just started?

What to do is easy. Slip one or the other of the two stitches temporarily in order to release the marker, take it off the needle, and replace it one stitch over to the left or to the right so the two stitches can be worked togeather as required. If the working unit is "k2 tog, yo", for instance, and the marker is between the two stitches, you take it off, knit two togeather, put it back, then work the yo. This replaces the marker in exactly the same spot were it was before. If the two stitches are to be twisted or cabled, then you remover the marker one stitch away from its place, work the twist or cross, and continue with the next round, not forgetting to move the marker back again to its original place the next time you come around to it. Once the diagonal pattern has crossed the marker, it belongs to the round where it is now, even though the action of crossing is may have taken place on the other side of the marker.
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